Deb Evans ABR,CSG - ERA Key Realty Services



Posted by Deb Evans ABR,CSG on 7/23/2019

Minimalism has taken hold of a generation of new homeowners. Many young families may move multiple times before finding a forever home. Throughout the sorting, packing, loading, moving, and unloading they realize that much of what they carry with them is not necessary for comfortable living. Many folks have accepted the challenge to pare unused and cluttering items from their lives. Whether you are planning to move soon, just moved into your forever home, or are somewhere in-between, you can benefit from paring down and decluttering your life.

Discover freedom

Proponents of decluttering from Marie Kondo, star of Netflix's hit show, "Tidying Up With Marie Kondo," to Genevieve Parker Hill, author of Minimalist Living: Decluttering for Joy, Health, and Creativity, believe that reducing your home’s clutter, overflow, and disorganization help to free up your time, energy, and happiness. The concept of removing disorganization from your life sets you up to more effortless living.

You can join an online challenge ranging anywhere from three days to six weeks to fit your schedule. Alternatively, you can make a pact with friends or siblings to cheer each other through it or challenge yourself to carry out a list of decluttering items in one day or over several days. If you take on the challenge by yourself, create a suitable reward for your efforts.

Clear your mind first

Before you try to clear your home of clutter, take some time to organize your thoughts first. 

  • Write down what you hope to achieve by decluttering: more space? More peace? Better time management?
  • Note where you want to start. You may be able to declutter your entire home, but before you bite of that enormous chunk, create an order of priority. Is the hall closet most important? The pantry? Perhaps your biggest headache is your closet, attic, or garage. Start with that one place. If you try to do too many spaces at once, you may end up discouraged before you start.
  • Set aside the day or days for your challenge. Block off your schedule. Putting it off got you into this position in the first place and any interrupted to your challenge dates might tempt you to indulge in procrastination once again.

Once you have determined the room you will start with, prepare four boxes for sorting: 

  • Discard – items too used or useless to give to a charity or thrift store need tossing. Do not donate anything beyond its useful life. At the end of each day, you will discard these items so that you avoid the temptation to put them back in your house.
  • Recycle – if you no longer use it for its original purpose, but you know you could use it someplace else, put it in the “recycle” box.
  • Give – items you no longer use, but that someone else could go in the “give” box. You can donate these to a charity or thrift store or give them to family members or friends that want them and will use them. Immediately place this box in your car to give away as soon as possible.
  • Keep – this is what goes back in this location, or into another place. Once you clean out the area, return to it only the items that belong there. If you have other keep items, move them to the room or location they belong in so that they no longer clutter up your space.

When you finish, reward yourself. Then, set up the next challenge. If you plan to put your home on the market, to give a deadline to your challenge, have your real estate agent set an open house date.





Posted by Deb Evans ABR,CSG on 12/13/2016

Clutter can be categorized as a nuisance, an annoyance and simply the bane of many’s existence. It accumulates so quickly and it seems like it comes out of nowhere. Between you and your family or roommates, there are often multiple people contributing to the clutter. And it can make your rooms feel cramped and look messy. Here are a few tips for cleaning up that clutter and keeping it at bay. Clean: Take note of the areas that attract the most clutter and determine why that type of clutter builds up in that area. Taking control of where and why clutter is piling up will only help you in the future. Once you have a handle of the type of clutter and where it’s coming from, sort through it. Throw out or recycle what can be tossed and put away anything that has a storage location. Dust and vacuum the de-cluttered area after de-cluttering. Storage: Having the appropriate storage is essential for clearing up clutter and keeping it from piling back up. Often times clutter accumulates because there is nowhere to put things. Whether it’s hooks and shoe storage for entryways and mudrooms or drawers or bookcases for bedrooms or workspaces, storage is essential. Process: Whether it’s clutter in your mudroom or entryway, on your dining room table, the chair in your bedroom, or on top of your desk, there must be a process for putting things away and therefore eliminating any chance of clutter. If considering an entryway with optimal storage make sure children hang up their backpacks and coats when they enter the home and store their shoes in the appropriate place. If children usually do their homework on the dining room table then make sure they understand it needs to be picked up each night. Having a small storage container nearby will make this even easier. Eliminating clutter altogether is a feat many cannot conquest, but adding a process will be sure to help. Cleaning and eliminating clutter is the easy part, but keeping that clutter away is a much larger task to undertake. It will take time to remember to put things away or throw out unnecessary things and keep processes in place. However, you will be much happier in a clutter free, clean home. Think of all the extra space you will have to eat, sit and walk! Having a process in place for children, and anyone else for that matter, is essential for having a clutter free home.







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